Skip to main content

HOW TO GAIN COOPERATION BEFORE INSTRUCTION #1

BRAINSAREFUN FEARLESS FRIDAY SKILLS, TOOLS AND SOLUTIONS — News from the reading renaissance

Cooperation before instruction (Something Mr. Miyagi fully understood in the Karate Kid)

Supervisors of all stripes (parents, teachers, bosses…) want to walk around and "check in." They want to be useful and provide a good example of  what it means to "work together."

Here's a useful tool I cribbed from Tim Ferriss' book, The 4-Hour Workweek. I think it's a very good example of how to acquire "cooperation before instruction" at home, at school, in the workplace. Of course, you will have to modify it to work well for you:

YOU – Hello Betty. Do you have a minute, I need some help? (Begin by asking permission to interrupt.)

BETTY (child, student, employee…) – Sure, what can I do? (Cooperation before instruction.)

YOU – Here's what's going on: all this talk about priorities and our future have my head spinning a bit. Normally priorities are pretty clear to me, but I need your help making sure which tasks should be on the top of the list right now.

Could you please give me a list of 5 tasks that need to be done so I can get a better idea about how you see it. It will really help me?

BETTY – O.K. (More cooperation.)

YOU – That would be great. Could you email me your list by the end of the day tomorrow?

BETTY – I can do that (Agreement established.)

YOU – Thanks Betty, I really appreciate your help (Reward immediately with eye contact and a smile). Shaking hands, a touch on the shoulder, thumbs up, hugging… are all great ways to make physical contact as appropriate.

POSTSCRIPT – Send me your examples of gaining cooperation. Working together, we really do make a difference.

Thanks, Rory